A Partial Exegesis
I apologize for any dropped diacriticals, italics, boldface or special characters in the text below. This is a copy-and-paste job from Word. Someday maybe I'll correct it--perhaps when I get around to posting the etymological notes which will require much finessing.

18.1.1 ) by day, by night, more than mere asyndeton: repetitio.

18.1.2 ) up there, repetitio again.

18.1.4 ) like a, simile on a metaphor.

18.2.1 ) and drear and cold, polysyndeton and hendiadys.

18.2.3 ) tapestries, maroon and gold, anastrophe.

18.4.3 ) needs oppress, ellipsis.

19.1.2 ) Gamolända, fraught with greed, pleonasm.

20.2.3 ) Asyndeton. fi'ry, syncope.

20.3.1 ) bloom to bloom, repetitio, perhaps diacope.

20.3.3 ) [is she] of nectar barren, apt to sting, zeugma.

20.3.4 ) [is she] more akin to wasp, zeugma.

20.4.4 ) and, [ = "as"], polysyndeton.

21.1.2 ) feline, vain, asyndeton.

21.2.1 ) thou'st, syncope. Note indentation convention for dialog: the first speaker's dialog is unindented, the second speaker's is indented in the fashion of the narrative passages (2nd and 4th lines indented).

21.2.4 ) hie -- hasten.

21.3.1 ) So, polysyndeton. houpland, syncopic form of houpeland.

21.4.2 ) stately stew, formerly "public bath", which is a "stew". sojourns, like "sortie" of 2.2.3, shift the stress to the final syllable, with apologies to speakers of French.

22.1.1 ) know'st, syncope.

22.3.1 ) 'tis synaloepha.

22.3.3 ) hyperbaton.

22.3.4 ) hyperbaton.


22.4.1 ) Kõskars: s, a mythological (Rathvardic) barbarian tribe.

22.4.3 ) cannot defend... aposiopesis.

22.4.4 ) certain, anthimeria for "certainly".

23.2.3 ) lying down, focative pun.

23.2.4 ) pressing need arise, ithyphallic pun.

23.3.3 ) mounting, focative pun on "mount" of preceding line.

23.3.4 ) not arise... aging loins, ithyphallic pun.

23.4.1 ) a quaint, by tmesis, a pun on "acquaint" of 23.3.1, since quaint prob. akin to Archaic E quean, hussy, prostitute < ME queyne < OE cwene < IE gwenā, woman > Gr Gynē, woman, but also quoin var. coin < OFr coigne < L cuneus < IE -, pointed which perhaps? > ON kunta > ME cunte > Vulg E cunt owing to the wedge-shaped mons veneris?

24.1.1 ) There ought to be a name for this particular shift in narrative: a standing aside impartially, an avoidance of stating the obvious or expected in favor of an unemotional discussion on the subject.

24.1.4 ) braid, aphaearetic for "upbraid" < IE bregdān, to pull.

24.2.1 ) Clack! onomatopoetic cacophony, asterismos.

24.2.4 ) halo, angelic imagery.

24.3.3 ) cringing codger, cacophonous alliteration.

24.3.4 ) grimaced, cacophony.

24.4.4 ) familiar, taken as either, "what one is accustomed to", or "of the family".

25.1.1 ) The beginning of an extended sentence (well into the next canto), imitative of the on-going argument.

25.2.3 ) dight -- decorated.

25.4.2 ) pleasance -- garden.

25.4.4 ) capriole -- capering "goat"-like dance; a punning mockery of the lecherous castle steward, Gléngstole.

26.1.1 ) Asudden, synaloepha for "All of a sudden".

26.1.2 ) desp'rate, syncope.

26.1.3 ) pack... crashing hounds, assonance and alliteration bind these three cacophonic words.

26.2.1 ) But, polysyndeton. lithe... body, hyperbaton.

26.2.4 ) This shift in narrative from the dramatic to the coolly informative is similar to the device employed at 24.1.1.

26.3.2 ) Hyperbaton through 26.3.3.

27.1.4 ) capricious, same root but contrasting with "capriole" of 25.4.4.

27.2.1 ) This is the beginning of a extended aporia: her beauty is described by not describing it. The tongue-in-cheek irony is intentional, but the passage is not without its truth and beauty.

conceits, that tiresome, archaic device employed by Elizabethan and other poets: favorably comparing body parts to flowers and fruits and snow, etc., etc.

27.2.2 ) rare... enjambment with next line... (as if tongue-tied).

27.2.3 ) How... rhetorical question, first of several that make the narrative seem more like an intimate conversation between friends.

27.3.1 ) Then second rhetorical question, this one shifting from the sublime to the ridiculous to make a strong point.

27.3.2 ) pluck a petal loose, nice, prickly pair (!) of alliterations.

27.3.1 ) tomato, anachronistic but too silly to pass up!

27.4.1 ) Polysyndeton.

27.4.2 ) imbues... gloom, assonance that closes nicely to a nasal.

28.2.2 ) To list... blatant aporia!

28.3.4 ) Aposiopesis: here, during a tender moment, shifting to the third rhetorical question.

28.4.1 ) Polysyndeton and beginning of the fourth rhetorical question.

29.2.1 ) Enjambment from the line above as if caught up in the memory while describing it.

29.2.3 ) Polysyndeton. What follows is an explanation of the mocking game.

29.4.1 ) "O come my sweets!" formerly, "Come here my sweets!" which lacked the "yoo-hoo" quality. Also, see Eric Partridge's comments on the bawdy use of "O".

29.4.3 ) (pinch) your comely... Ask..., obvious word play on "pinch your comely ass".

29.4.4 ) tunic... uncinch! to further emphasize the point.

Here begins Book Three.

30.1.1 ) At first encounter with Bórval, the similarity to Éorath is intentional.

30.1.2 ) from afar, repetitio, previous line.

yet... contradiction: i.e. we are not speaking so much about physical distance as cultural.

30.2.1 ) Repetitio, line 30.1.1. dale, rhyme ties this stanza closely to the previous, indicating an extension of idea.

30.2.2 ) wild'ring, aphaearesis and syncope, "bewildering". With wondrous ways, the alliteration is heightened...

30.2.3 ) ...and is continued with where... weens ( = imagines). where... there internal rhyme adds to the hypnotic flow.

30.2.4 ) (enveil)... in silks and praise, isocolon.

30.3.4 ) unmeet -- unsuitable... ahh, pardon the pun, unfitting.

30.4.2 ) Did you catch the name?

30.4.3 ) rede... reck, same as in Shakespeare: council... heed.

30.4.4 ) wist -- knew.

31.1.1 ) steely eyes: according to 6.2.3, Éorath has blue eyes. But that's not the first of the dissimilarities we'll discover.

31.1.2 ) slade -- like vale (30.1.1), dale (30.2.1) it means "valley". far yet near, repeating the contradiction of 30.1.

31.1.4 ) not yet a peer, in fact, well on his way, he's the non-chivalric equivalent of Bórval's squire...

31.2.1 ) ... and long-time friend.

31.2.3 ) gossoon -- attendant, serving boy < gasson < Fr garçon, boy.

31.2.4 ) bridesgroom, extrapolated archaic form of bridegroom < bride's groom.

31.3.1 ) (-- 31.4.4) Okay, a bit obsequious, but this is courtly colloquy.

31.3.3 ) fain -- gladly.

31.4.2 ) diff'rent, syncope.

31.4.3 ) wist -- ME preterit, "knew".

31.4.4 ) marriage ban -- engagement announcement.

32.1.2 ) (arranged wedlock): carefully chosen noun.

32.1.3 ) Alliteration.

32.2.1 ) wast, old 2nd person sing. preterit for "was" (also, wert).

32.2.3 ) as lief -- prefer.

32.2.1 ) Notice in this stanza how the continuity of Bórval's speech is broken as it follows several trains of thought.

32.2.3 ) Aposiopesis...

32.2.4 ) He thinks of a polite way of expressing his desire for the ways of war over the ways of peace.

32.4.2 ) This parenthetical note (continued on next line) stands apart as an ominous warning.

32.4.3 ) Alliteration on "gr" strengthened by assonance of achieve (previous line), greed, and leave next line.

32.4.4 ) After the omen, now a return to the mundane.

33.1.1 ) Alone, again. Familiar? Obvious parallel with 1.1.1 ff.

This is the beginning of a 3-stanza cyclic sentence.

33.1.2 ) alone, anaphora, loosely (repetitio at least).

solus, can be read as either Latin for "alone", or as the medieval penalty inflicted on a printer for making mistakes! You decide.

33.1.3 ) right of lineage: we =expect= a nobleman to live somewhat alone and detached from trivial worldly matters.

33.1.4 ) More than polysyndeton, with repetition of grammatical structure, this too is a form of anaphora. past misdeeds: paying for one's transgressions.

33.2.1 ) The subject.

33.2.2 ) Predicting ill fortune to come.

33.2.3 ) Predicate of the cycle. Certes -- certainly.

33.3.1 ) else, supply asyndetonic, "or".

unrædmod -- "unready spirit", ambivalent state of mind.

33.3.3 ) Brief sentence after long highlights the simplicity of logic involved in his choosing a path.

33.4.1 ) Repetitio of 33.1.1 rounds out the canto leaving us where we started: alone in thought.

33.4.2 ) `neath, aphaearesis. ev'ning, syncope, = the planet Venus.

33.4.3 ) daily pilgrimage across the sky.

33.4.4 ) course = both "course of action" and "path, way".

34.1.1 ) Polysyndeton. Beginning of another extended sentence. point, i.e. the Evening Star.

34.1.2 ) fell < ME fel, barren, rocky hill.

34.2.1 ) Shift of perspective by way of point-of-light metaphor.

34.3.3 ) I.e. Deóra speaks to someone behind her, who is dressed...

34.3.4 ) in strange (viz. contradictory) garb ( = habiliments).

34.4.1 ) Strange in the sense that they do not seem natural to someone so aged and plain ( = simply made).

34.4.3 ) For she apparently sports long, braided hair.

"..." -- not ellipsis but indicative of a pause, for its "punch line" effect.

34.4.4 ) The visual illusion unmasked.

35.1.1 ) Change of indenting style: Deóra's dialogue not indented.

Polysyndeton indicative of a conversation in progress.

35.1.3 ) Polysyndeton, here to convey the flurry of questions, the flood of concerns. Hyperbaton.

35.1.4 ) I.e. without struggle, allow her virtue to be compromised.

35.2.1 ) Arstaff's lines are indented.

35.2.2 ) kith -- friends.

35.2.3 ff. I.e. must show him the respect his position demands.

35.3.1 ) she, meaning Arstaff.

35.4.1 ) she, meaning Deóra.

35.4.2 ) Asyndeton.

35.4.3 ) Hyperbaton.

35.4.4 ) posiopesis.

etc, etc, etc...

Copyright © 2004 - 2011 Brian Zegarski, all rights reserved.